DDS, MQTT and the Internet of Things

The commoditization of network connectivity is providing the foundation for the Internet of Things – a system in which data flows seamlessly, at Internet Scale, between network-connected devices, mobile devices, industrial and information systems.  Yet, network connectivity alone is not sufficient; another key building block needed for the Internet of Things are standards for interoperable data sharing – as without standardized open data sharing there is no Internet of Things.

The Object Management Group (OMG) Data Distribution Service for Real-Time Systems (DDS) and the upcoming OASIS Message Queuing Telemetry Transport (MQTT) provide two excellent examples of standards that address the Internet of Things.

Introduced in 2006, DDS has established itself as the standard for peer-to-peer real-time data sharing in Operational Systems , such as Air Traffic Management Systems, Medical Systems, and Combat Systems.  DDS has recently experienced rapid adoption as the foundation for an increasing number of Intelligent Systems in applications such as Smart Cities, Smart Grids, and m-Health.

MQTT was introduced in 1999 by IBM as a publish / subscribe, extremely simple and lightweight messaging protocol, designed for constrained devices and low-bandwidth, high-latency or unreliable networks.

DDS and MQTT share some common principles, such as parsimony and efficiency, temporal decoupling and anonymity, yet each technology has some unique features that make it most applicable for certain use cases.

For instance, MQTT is most suitable for sporadic messages and highly resource constrained devices whilst DDS is most suitable for those applications that require real-time data exchange – meaning applications in which data has an inherent temporal validity and in which stale data should never delay fresh data– and tight control over the Quality of Service (QoS).  In addition DDS supports peer-to-peer (infrastructure-less) communication, a feature that comes in handy for device-to-device communications.

In summary, DDS and MQTT are two very good standards for data sharing in the Internet of Things. DDS provides support for both Device-to-Cloud (Device-to-Data Center) communication as well as Device-to-Device.  MQTT provides very good support for Device-to-Data Center communication.

Finally, I have produced an ondemand webcast on Building the Internet of Things which you can access at: http://www.prismtech.com/opensplice/resources/webcast-archive.

A+

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s